Galileo class

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Galileo class (SFC)

The Galileo class entered service in 2036. One of the most durable workhorses in spaceflight history, Galileo class ships were early fusion ships that could attain modest relativistic speeds (.2c; later .35c) and began to take humanity into interstellar space. In the 2040s, the Galileo class was the primary ship class to the asteroid belt, and in the 2050s, it was the most popular carrier to the outer planets. The Galileo class vessels were retired from service in 2060. The Galileo class featured a complement of 98 personnel, including six officers and 92 enlisted crew members, and could be modified with multiple forward fuel spheres for extended missions. The Galileo class was the first Human vessel equipped with elementary interstellar celestial navigation.[1]

Galileo class vessels

Specifications

Length 300m
Diameter 120.7m
Mass
  • empty: .5 billion kg
  • loaded: 4.84 billion kg
Fuel Sphere main: 920,000
Crew Compartment
  • 6 decks
  • length: 40.8m
  • diameter: 35.5m
Cargo Volume 40,000
Forward Command Sensor Disc Diameter 35.5 m
Propulsion 24 Space Op Fusion Engines with 10 laser/electron fusion initiators per engine
Fuel Frozen deuterium
Navigation Interplanetary Triangulation/Elementary Celestial Navigation
Communications
  • Encoded Particle Beam Telemetry
  • Exterior Crystal Communications Transceiver
Computer Intermediate Independent Thought Memory Scan
Life Support
  • Gravity: 0.4g
  • Atmosphere: 23% O&sub2;; 10% humidity
Range 12 years at standard ship's complement of 6

Performance

Range (Standard) 800 million km (Earth to asteroid belt)
Range (Maximum) 1013 km (~1 light year)
Cruising Velocity 200 million km/hr
Maximum Velocity 375 million km/hr
Typical Voyage Duration 17.4 hr (asteroid belt)
45 hr (Pluto Research Station)
Maximum Voyage Duration 2.3 years
Acceleration
  • 0-1 million km/hr: 3.55 hr
  • 1-100 million km/hr: 2.85 hr
  • 2-3.5 million km/hr: 3-10 hr
Thrust 10 million kg per fusion engine

FASA Timeline

Galileo class (SFC)

The Galileo class entered service in 2028. One of the most durable workhorses in spaceflight history, Galileo class ships were early fusion ships that could attain modest relativistic speeds (.2c; later .35c) and began to take humanity into interstellar space. In the 2030s, the Galileo class was the primary ship class to the asteroid belt, and in the 2040s, it was the most popular carrier to the outer planets. The Galileo class vessels were retired from service in 2052. The Galileo class featured a complement of 98 personnel, including six officers and 92 enlisted crew members, and could be modified with multiple forward fuel spheres for extended missions. The Galileo class was the first Human vessel equipped with elementary interstellar celestial navigation.[1]

Galileo class vessels

Specifications

Length 300m
Diameter 120.7m
Mass
  • empty: .5 billion kg
  • loaded: 4.84 billion kg
Fuel Sphere main: 920,000
Crew Compartment
  • 6 decks
  • length: 40.8m
  • diameter: 35.5m
Cargo Volume 40,000
Forward Command Sensor Disc Diameter 35.5 m
Propulsion 24 Space Op Fusion Engines with 10 laser/electron fusion initiators per engine
Fuel Frozen deuterium
Navigation Interplanetary Triangulation/Elementary Celestial Navigation
Communications
  • Encoded Particle Beam Telemetry
  • Exterior Crystal Communications Transceiver
Computer Intermediate Independent Thought Memory Scan
Life Support
  • Gravity: 0.4g
  • Atmosphere: 23% O&sub2;; 10% humidity
Range 12 years at standard ship's complement of 6

Performance

Range (Standard) 800 million km (Earth to asteroid belt)
Range (Maximum) 1013 km (~1 light year)
Cruising Velocity 200 million km/hr
Maximum Velocity 375 million km/hr
Typical Voyage Duration 17.4 hr (asteroid belt)
45 hr (Pluto Research Station)
Maximum Voyage Duration 2.3 years
Acceleration
  • 0-1 million km/hr: 3.55 hr
  • 1-100 million km/hr: 2.85 hr
  • 2-3.5 million km/hr: 3-10 hr
Thrust 10 million kg per fusion engine

References